NIST Draft Test Procedures added and updated

Check out the NIST Draft Test Procedures site; the following test documents have been updated:

  • Drug-drug, drug-allergy, drug formulary checks
  • Medication reconciliation. Electronically complete medication reconciliation of two or more medication lists by comparing and merging into a single medication list that can be electronically displayed in real-time.
  • Access control. Assign a unique name and/or number for identifying and tracking user identity and establish controls that permit only authorized users to access electronic health information.
  • Emergency access. Permit authorized users (who are authorized for emergency situations) to access electronic health information during an emergency.
  • Automatic log-off. Terminate an electronic session after a predetermined time of inactivity.
  • Audit log
  • Integrity
  • Authentication
  • Encryption
  • Accounting of Disclosures.
  • Clinical Decision Support
  • Electronic copy of health information. Enable a user to create an electronic copy of a patient’s clinical information, including, at a minimum, diagnostic test results, problem list, medication list, medication allergy list, immunizations, and procedures
  • Clinical Summaries
  • Exchange Clinical Information and Patient Summary Record
  • Clinical Decision Support
  • Electronic copy of health information. Enable a user to create an electronic copy of a patient’s clinical information, including, at a minimum, diagnostic test results, problem list, medication list, medication allergy list, immunizations, procedures, and discharge summary
  • Exchange Clinical Information and Summary Record

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3 thoughts on “NIST Draft Test Procedures added and updated

  1. Maybe I am missing something, but shouldn't there be a mechanism to test that the source system has correctly identified the patient in the external systems?

    It seems like this is seldom discussed. Given that there is not a standard and universal numbering system, how does one safely, correctly and uniquely identify the correct patient is being accessed in an Electronic Health Record one does not control?

    1. Will — you are quite right; the NIST test procedures right now are dealing with all the “easy stuff” that we've known how to do for decades. All the hard stuff is still waiting and I don't think NIST can do much about those at this time because their personnel are still getting up to speed on healthcare IT issues which are mostly new to them.

      Thanks for the question — I'll probably blog about the topic separately.

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