Anecdote-driven systems engineering and complaint-based interoperability design will not solve health IT woes

As I’ve been preparing to chair the HealthIMPACT conference in Houston next Thursday I’ve been having some terrific conversations with big companies like Cisco, some of our publishing partners, and smaller vendors entering the health IT space for the first time. One great question I was asked during a discussing yesterday by a tech publisher was “so what’s it going to take to achieve real interoperability in healthcare and how long will it take? ...

Join me and other cheerleaders at the “Driving demand for Healthcare Interoperability” Pep Rally this Thursday in DC

When I was growing up in Texas I remember that we used to have Pep Rallies before our major sporting events. The idea behind a pep rally is to get the juices flowing and get fans engaged and cheering for the home team. On Thursday this week the West Health Institute and the ONC are hosting “Health care Innovation Day, HCI-DC 2014: Igniting an Interoperable Health Care System” where the purpose is to get people cheering for interoperability between EHRs, health IT systems, medical devices, and related technologies. ...

If Meaningful Use disappeared, how would EHR vendors change their products?

I’ve often said that Meaningful Use and the HITECH Act created false demand for EHRs and has (perhaps irrevocably) harmed innovation in the EHR space by standardizing features and function rather than outcomes and expectations. It’s a false demand because it concentrated too much on prescriptive, sometimes useless, and in many cases productivity-killing, functionality instead of focusing on what’s really needed — data interoperability and fostering innovation. John Halamka wrote something similar recently in his Advice to the new ONC chief (highlights in red below are mine, not John’s): ...

Guest Article: Top 5 PACS interconnectivity and interoperability issues and their solutions

Most health IT interoperability and connectivity discussions these days center around HL7, CCD, and other structured data interchange. However, the vast majority of data (in terms of size) is shared as images and documents. The DICOM and PACS standards are very successful but given the number of questions I get about them from readers it seems there’s still a lot of guidance and support needed. To help  answer some of the most common technical questions, I reached out to a fellow health IT expert, Herman Oosterwijk from OTech. ...