Health-focused wearables have a chance of improving patient care if innovators craft solutions plus providers and insurers work together to incentivize and pay for them

I’ve been interested in the new “wearables” segment for a while. I reached out to Cameron Graham, the managing editor at TechnologyAdvice where he oversees market research for emerging technology, to give us some evidence-driven advice about wearables that entrepreneurs, innovators, healthcare providers, and payers can use for decision making. Specifically, what does the current research show and what are the actionable insights for how to incentivize patients to use them and figure out why patients might pay for them? ...

ENGAGE can help pharma and biotech learn how to benefit from patient engagement

Patient engagement is something that physicians have done for thousands of years as they cared for patients (whether going to their homes or having them come to hospitals or clinics). With new digital health technologies the way providers can engage with patients is changing significantly but we’re not quite sure about the best ways to apply that technology. This is why I’m looking forward to attending MedCityNews.com’s ENGAGE conference next week in Washington, DC. ...

Writing safety critical software using an agile, risk-based, approach should be the norm in modern medical device development

I first started using and mentoring developers on agile software development techniques like eXtreme Programming (XP) and Scrum over a decade ago. Often called “lightweight” methodologies, agile software development lifecycles have been generally misunderstood as lacking enough rigor and sophistication to be used in safety-critical systems. Many have erroneously assumed that Agile, Scrum, and related methodologies can’t really be implemented in risk-focused “important” industries like medical devices because they believe only classic waterfall will be accepted by the FDA. ...

Guest Article: Achieving product simplicity in healthcare offerings is hard but possible

_I’m a geek and proud of it — I love building software, launching new products, and am a fan of others that do it well. Recently I ran across the Berlin-based team from kenHub, a site focused on teaching anatomy online and helping medical students prepare for tests. I reached out to the team to ask them how they were differentiating themselves from the many other solutions available they said their goal was to simplify the process of learning using new didactic concepts to focus on memorizing and gamification elements to make it fun and engaging. ...